Published 06/09/17 by Bryant University

Mario Hernández ’97 MBA has leveraged his “never give up” work ethic with an undergraduate degree in systems engineering, and postgraduate studies at Bryant University and Harvard Business School to revolutionize the electronic payments industry. He is the founder, CEO, and chairman of the board of IMPESA and the creator of Monibyte, the company’s innovative corporate payments platform that has processed millions of international transactions since 2014.

“You can’t be a person who specializes in just one thing because sooner or later you’re going to need a different set of skills.”

It’s no surprise that Monibyte was developed completely in-house by IMPESA engineers and programmers. Hernández recalls that the best advice he ever received was from a boss who advised him to “work hard to find what drives your people. Find their purpose in life – why they come to work every day. If you really understand what drives people and help them accomplish that, you will be very successful.”

For Hernández, professional success is the result of hard work and continued education. “You have to work very hard,” he says, “and you learn from every experience at every point in life. The world changes by the minute and you really have to be on top of everything that’s going on. You can’t be a person who specializes in just one thing because sooner or later you’re going to need a different set of skills.”

Hernández believes that good leaders and successful entrepreneurs live by the same rule: never, ever give up. “As a leader, you will find people who don’t agree with what you’re doing and sometimes you want to give up,” he explains. “If you have an idea, that doesn’t mean you can’t listen to what other people are saying. Listen, but at the end of the day, make a decision and move on.”

He adds, “Whenever anyone tells you, ‘that’s a great idea,’ most likely someone has already done it. When you’re disrupting and changing the way things are normally done, you will find lots of people who say ‘that can’t be done.’ When you hear that, it means you’re on the right track. When I have an idea and people tell me ‘you can’t do that,’ that’s a driver for me and I just keep going.”

See the original article here.